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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
is the continued united states pre-eminence, not just in demand space programs but in terms of science and inventions and everything else that goes along with it, and it ended up being washed away in the flood of stimulus france. as this hearing has highlighted already, the president's approach to human spaceflight lacks a clear mission and he is relying on the success of commercial space, which i agreed is vital that has dragged its feet and pushed its flight at nasa. i strongly support a public-private partnership for the country's space policy. however, it is up to nasa to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector doesn't have enough funds to do it by itself, and that heavy lift rocket needs enough thrust to overcome the administration shortsightedness. now why cancel inhofe, the international partners who supported the mission, president obama has taken a been there and done that approach but we haven't been there for 40 years and the international partners who would have helped us have never been there. if we cannot lead the world with space, china and russia will i
engineers to hire. britain's universities lead the world in teaching science and engineering and yet we have an annual shortfall of 60,000 graduates and nine of ten post graduate students in those subjects are from overseas. what more can we do? >> my hon. friend is entirely right and we need to tackle this problem at every level, making sure we are teaching math and science and stem subject probably and there are signs the number of people taking those subjects are increasing. we need to make sure our universities are properly funded and make sure that is the case but we also need to raise the profile about engineering and that is one of the reasons we introduced the 1 million pound prize, for engineering. that combined with 34 university technologies will make sure we train engineers we need for the future. >> it is more important than ever in northern ireland that we continue moving forward away from violence and create stability and i am sure the prime minister will agree to me that food participation and support for the political and democratic process by everybody so people's issues ca
. [applause] >> thank you very much, everyone, for coming. thank you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm
and assault rifles and so on. they have had no mass shootings since. this is not rocket science. it's there to be had. the problem is that the nra, and i'm sure mr. jones is a big fan of theirs and probably helps them. >> he probably thinks they're way, way,way too much part of the establishment. he's way, way to the right of the nra. >> the political power the nra now wield means that politicians are too coward to say anything. i have people say to me, you're so brave. hot is brave about wanting to stop 20 more children getting murders? >> i don't think it's the nra power. it's people like us, not the two of us, but americans who care about guns aren't doing enough to make our case to the public. >> why not? >> because we think it's their issue. we have given that issue over to them because they have lobbyists they pay money. in the end, the people determine the outcome. and it's wrong, and it's racist and it's bigoted to say that guns are quintessentially american. they may represent a part of america, but my grandparents who came over from poland and live in brooklyn, new york, a
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? >>> our second story outfront. is the tea party dead? it's been a rough few months, losing a battle over the fiscal cliff, and now, one tea party leader admitting to politico, quote, there's not enough money. erick erickson, an influential republican, and amy cramer. and i know you and i have talked a lot over the past year plus coming through this election and now here we are a year later, "politico" reporting that the tea party is struggling for money and asking all kinds of groups it hasn't always con
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story outfront. is the tea party dead? it's been a rough few months, losing a battle over the fiscal cliff, and now, one tea party leader admitting to politico, quote, there's not enough money. erick erickson, an influential republican, and amy cramer. and i know you and i have talked a lot over the past year plus coming through this election and now here we are a year later, "politico" reporting that the tea party is struggling for money and asking all kinds of groups it hasn't always considered to be a friend. american majority, club for growth and the koch brothers, asking all of them for money. is the tea party going to have to compromise its principles in order to survive? >> no, erin, i don't think we are going to have to compromise our principles. look, if you look back to 2010 when the tea party movement drove the messaging, we won, we had huge victories across the country. when you look at 2012 and the republican party d
illnesses like salmonella, listeria and e. coli. one of the proposed rules requires science based standards for growing, harvesting, packing and holding produce on domestic and foreign firms. the sec rule requires companies that plans for full board illnesses. each year one out of every six americans could six from the board illnesses and about 3000 die. if the proposed rules get the ok companies live for years to comply. >> we will take a quick break at 720 and take a quick look outside at the fog. this is the 680 camera giant traveling through the fog in the foreground. we will be right back. here you go little man. [ humming ] [ babbling ] the cheerios bandit got you again? [ both laugh ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios ...and now... you! [ giggles ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios mommy! i went potty! that's great, honey.... where? for life's bleachable moments. >> dams, as the suspect in the colorado will be theaters shooting is expected to appear in court in less than an hour. the grisly details surrounding the mass shooting could finally go public as a gag order will be lifted and deta
. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ thank you. science and evidence based drug and alcohol treatment center. where your addiction stops and your new life begins. call now. isurprise...it's eating less. to losing weight. i'm hungry just thinking about it. thank goodness for new slimful. one delicious, 90-calorie slimful and a glass of water, like before dinner, helps keep me satisfied for hours. so instead of this much, i only need this much. and slimful tastso good... i don't even miss dessert. slimful and a glass of water... eating less is a beautiful thing. >>> in colorado today, the preliminary hearing for accused shooter james holmes ended with these words, he intended to kill them all. joining me now, those whose loved ones were killed in that shooting. also, his son also died in the attack, welcome to you both. i would like to ask you for your reaction on larry pratt, the first time i interviewed him i found my own blood boiling when i hear the less crime, more guns argument. but what did you think? >> i definitely think piers that more guns are not the answer. because, that puts that
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> nobody knows the pain of gun violence quite like the kennedy family. listen to the conversation with the world's top treatment experts. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> two kennedys. i can't think of two better people to ask about this debate. and your reaction to the interview i had with alex jones. what did you feel? >> it was disheartening, i think. just to see the anger there and also, you know, he kept talking about the second amendment. the second amendment, thomas jefferson, who wrote the second amendment, said it should be revisited every 20 years to see if it's still appropriate. i mean, this is -- this is something that was written a long time ago. and he probably doesn't even know what the real intent of the second amendment was. so for him to quote this and just the absole vitriol of it is really disheartening. >> i was just disturbed. disturbed as a human being that this is what our civil discourse has come to. what makes our country so great is that we're about passing power pea
countries. apparently it is our own faults. according to researchers at the national academy of sciences we succumb too soon from things like obesity, heart disease and carpal tunnel syndrome. and despite spending more than double on health care than other so-called nations like britain, france and sweden, we don't live any longer and we are not as healthy. says the lead doctor, quote, the size of the health disadvantage was pretty stunning. why are we so sickly? a bunch of reasons such as our fondness for fast-food. and car accidents, gun violence and drug over doses are major contributors to years of life lost by americans before age 50. and as that did doctor from before put it, we have a country that cherishes personal autonomy and wants to limit intrusion of entities in our lives. some of the forces may act against the ability to achieve optimal health outcomes. also we apparently consume too many cigarettes. >> adults, don't try that at home. kids, do whatever you wants. >> roger, welcome to the show. is this saying we would be healthier? >> the whole problem is the government wasn't
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robitussin®. don't suffer the coughequences™. and the active ingredient relieves your cough. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe that when pigs fly. ok, did she seriously just say that? geico. just click away with our free mobile app. >>> kate middleton is the most popular member of the royal family. it does not surprise you. her fans love creating tributes to her. we have seen portraits pop up in galleries on buildings. that is someone's arm. that is really twisted. those teeth need a little whitening. that's what people have done. she has never had a
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> in colorado today, the preliminary hearing for accused shooting james holmes endeded with these words, he intended to kill them all. joining me now, those whose loved ones were killed in that shooting. if i may, by asking you for your reaction to my nfrt interview with larry operate. what did you think? >> i definitely think piers that more guns are not the answer. because, that puts that many more guns in the hands of people who have mental illness and it becomes a fear factor for people nationwide. >> tom, you lost your son in an appalling massacre. the worst single shooting in the history of the united states. when you hear somebody like larry pratt saying that the only way to ever deal with this is to plunge more guns into circulation what is your reaction to that? >> i struggle with it. a, i wonder what he would think if he was in my shoes and think about the scene and we have a good understanding of what the scene was like that night
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: today's announcement at the white house sets up a pair of potential confirmation fights. president obama's choices to oversee the pentagon and the c.i.a. will now be called to answer questions about everything from israel to iran to interrogations. there has been much speculation about both nominations, but the president made them official this afternoon in the east room of the white house. >> my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel, former secretary of defense and john brennan for director of the central intelligence agency. >> woodruff: hagel is a vietnam veteran who would replace the retiring leon panetta. he would be the first defense secretary who saw combat as an enlisted soldie
picture arts and sciences, and for us. he's welcome brian rose. rose.ase welcome brian [applause]next, we could not be more honored or delighted to have brooke gladstone with us tonight. she is the cohost of npr's "on the media." it also wrote a very entertaining book called "the influencing machine." we will be doing a signing of her book, it's just came out. she has been at npr for many years. including a three-year stint in moscow where she covered the last years of president boris yeltsin's term. i know that all of you diehard o the media" groupies will tell you that there is something about brooke that pulls you in. ira glass, host of this american life, put it right when he wrote, just like welcome gladwell, michael pollan, and michael lewis, brooke can take any subject, even something you do not give a damn about, and make it of interest. please welcome two-time peabody award winner brooke gladstone. [applause]>> thank you, catherine. thank you, brooke, for coming tonight. i would like to start with your book. you talk about a number of media biases. one of favorites is the narrat
actors guild, the producers guild, the academy of motion picture arts and sciences. please welcome brian rose. [applause] next, but could not be more delighted to have brooke gladstone here tonight. she is the managing editor and co-host of npr's "on the media" and author of a highly acclaimed book "the influencing machine.:" " we will be doing a signing of her book. she has been at npr for many years, including a three-year stint in moscow where she covered the last turbinate years of president yeltsin. i know all of you die hard groupies out there will agree there is something about brooke that pulls you in. each week, even at 7:00 a.m. on saturday, i think i -- the host of this american life put it right when he wrote -- just like malcolm glad well and michael lewis, brooke can take any subject, even something you deny give a dam about, and make a very interesting -- you don't give a damn about, and make it very interesting. please welcome brooke gladstone. [applause] >> thank you for coming tonight. i will like to start with your book. you talk about a number of media bias is. one of
? is there a debate? >> the science is so ov overwhelming. the parts per million of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has never been higher. that is proven. carbon dioxide holds in heat. that is proven. if you have something never higher holding in heat it is going to warm up the globe. it has to happen. the thing is can we do anything about the numbers going higher? the issue i have is ten years ago until now our cars are producing 50% less pollution but there is twice as many cars on the road. you are not gaining anything. even though we are trying to do the best we can we are not getting progress with the amount of carbon dioxide being pumped into the atmosphere. what can we do? what if we had a million machines that could disassociate carbon and oxygen and it sparked and the carbon would go out and the oxygen would go out. it just seems overwhelming. >> thanks for depressing me. >> i'm sorry. >> i think you are absolutely right. it is a tragedy. there are countries pumping stuff from factories and elsewhere into the atmosphere because they think it is their turn and the u.s. has had its industria
at harvard wrote a piece, an op-ed in "christian science monitor" in december of 2008 or so. ncrc proposed doing this with federal fund through a federal agency. and i wrote an article in "the new republic" in lar of 2010 suggesting treasury could use tarp fund and act exactly as the homeowners loan corporation had done, do this not for a profit but specifically to help homeowners. american securitization forum wasn't for that either. >> i just, real quick point on just clarify my position. i'm not opposed to the in concept the use of eminent domain for borrowers who are upside-down, who are current. i'm simply saying that the priority would be in my view for those who are already experiencing financial distress. when you get to the point of they're current, i think other tests could be put in place. that's why i think there needs to be a lot more detail on the table before there's a vote of yes or no. for example, if you're paying 70% of the your income to keep that mortgage current, do you want to force that homeowner to actually go into default before they actually get help and wreck th
association of colleges. brand new numbers on the range of salaries, for humanities and social sciences jobs, starting stallry, $37,000. john is laughing and giggling. $62,000 for engineers. choose your major wisely. but the good news here is that graduate salaries are rising and a little easier to get a job this year than last year. >> you need to do a story on that choose your major wisely. >> so hard when are you 18 to choose your major wisely. you're 18. >> you can give parameters and good advice, christine. i'll hold you to that. >>> coming up, look at this. the gun stunt that caused a police lockdown in the northwest. >>> nine years old and an oscar nominee. you will hear from her on what that's like. coming up. ♪ why not make lunch more than just lunch? with two times the points on dining in restaurants, you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. spending the day with my niece. i don't use super poligrip for hold because my dentures fit well. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was uncomfort
in university. his numerous books have garnered critical success from the american political science association for the best book in political science. he is also a key facilitator of a facility studies workshop. he has a great deal of experience in the policy field. the senior fellow, he is a former staff member a mark on the national security council and served six years on the national security advisory panel. most recently, he was part of a task force of experts about a new defense strategy for a new era. and a scholar at the american enterprise institute. he has more than three decades of public service and higher education. he was president of the world bank, dean of the johns hopkins school of international studies and assistant secretary of state for east asia. and long served at the pentagon. the great panel to be joined with. i will pose a question to each one of them to kick off the conversation then turn it over to all of you. the first question i want to pose to mike -- what the heck happened on new year's day and even what does it mean for defense? what do you see playing out in t
. but what do we learn from mummies? >> it's amazing. through modern science tools, we're able to learn about ancient people's civilizations. when people see mummies, who are they, where do they come from. it's a story waiting to be told. we are able to tell the age, the sex, how they lived, how they died. it's really an amazing exhibition. unlike hollywood myth, these mummies won't come out and get you. in fact they're awesome. just a breathtaking exhibition. >> that's what you say. what's your favorite? >> well, we have the youngest infant ever on display. a 6420-year-old infant radio carbon dating, $3,000 older than king tut. and what's interesting about this, it's a natural or what you would call accidental mummy from peru. such a beautiful, beautiful specimen, still has all of its hair, its facial expressions, it toenail, fingernails. very popular mummy. we also have the votch family, a mother, father and son. these mummies were found in a church in budapest during 18th century. the town was decimated in the white plague. the church floor boards popped occupy and due to the cool dry area
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> gretchen: big thanks to united airlines. they fly the family around. how people get involved? >> go to the web site, march for babies.org and get involved. >> gretchen: see you tomorrow. bill: nice job. good morning, everybody. fox news alert. what will be a bruising new fight over the nominations for president obama's new national security team. on the left, former senator chuck hagel if, the president's expected pick for defense secretary. he is facing critics that say he is anti-israel and too soft on iran on. on the right, john brennan, the counterterroism advisor, expected to head the cia he also comes along with some controversy. good morning everybody. huge welcome back to my partner in crime. martha: did you miss me? bill: tirelessly so. martha: good morning. happy new year. bill: back to reality. martha: back to reality. had a wonderful time. very good to be back. happy new year to you. to everybody at home. good morning. this is obviously
of anecdotal claims in lawsuits that aren't true when science is in. the people in pennsylvania brought in the epa and insists -- they said the water was safe. they were angry because that was the end of the lawsuit. every time there's an antidote and analysis, it shows that fracking doesn't pollute the water. >> we have a quote from the department of environmental conservation that finds fault with the new report saying the document is nearly a year old, does not reflect final policy and no conclusions should be drawn from this partial, outdated study. would it help to have a new study done? >> if you like throwing good money after bad. as you say, it's a rehash of hold studies. the first well in america was fracked in 1987. we've report after report and it's time to stop reporting and start doing. people need to take a decision on this. every time it comes to a new state or new country like my country, ireland, the analysis is done. >> one of the serious images was the fact people in fracking areas could light their tap water on fire. that was debunkedded because you proved it has bee
of everything, medicine, technology, science of every kind. no world war iii. something worked pretty well. they did something else that was particularly important. they built coalitions of common interest. i will come back to that. what they recognize, if we were to avert another 50 years like the world had been through the first of jeers and we were going to have to define relationships not by our differences but by our common interests. only then could we build foundations and mutual trust our mutual common interest in order to deal with the differences. you cannot start with the differences. it is a long time to figure that out. they did have it figured out. i will come back to that. i think it is particularly relevant today. what he said about civilizations was very instructive. he said civilizations' are movements. they're not conditions. they are journeys, and not harbors. he said the civilizations died. he chronicles 24 civilizations that have died. civilizations die from suicide, not for murder. when we think of the world today in the threat to mankind today, we're certainly capab
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)